'The long tail of science' ? Humanities, Social Sciences, and Open Science and Innovation

How can new initiatives like Open Science and Open Innovation boost European research, industry, and social welfare? How can we ensure that European collaboration can be enhanced despite current challenges? And what is the contribution universities and researchers can make to address some of Europe’s fundamental problems?

The Guild Policy Lab on Humanities, Social Sciences, and Open Science and Innovation brings together some of our leading scientists who have worked on Open Science and Open Innovation. They will examine the opportunities of Open Science and Open Innovation for research in Humanities and Social Sciences and how European institutions can best engage with it. Finally, they will discuss the potential for shared networks, research and communication flows for researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

 

 

Agenda

16.30: Registration

17.00: Welcome

17.05: Presentations and panel discussion

18.25: Closing remarks

18.30: Networking reception

 

Speakers:

Prof. Sheila Anderson, King’s College London

Sheila Andersen is Head of Department of Digital Humanities, where she is involved in a number of large European Humanities Research Infrastructure projects, working with researchers across different disciplines and with libraries and archives. Her interests include arts and humanities e-Science methods with a growing interest in the spatial humanities and deep mapping, particularly as methods that can help to visualize fuzzy, incomplete and sometimes contradictory archival source materials.

 

Prof. Eivind Engebretsen, University of Oslo

Eivind Engebretsen is Research Director at the Faculty of Medicine and Professor of Health Science with emphasis on the philosophy of science at the University of Oslo. His current research is mainly concerned with the discourse of ‘knowledge translation’ within medicine, its different genealogies and how it might be expanded by drawing on theories of translation from linguistics, philosophy and anthropology.

 

Prof. Gerhard Lauer, University of Göttingen

Gerhard Lauer is chair of German Philology at the University of Göttingen, where he conducts research on the relationship between mental processes and the structure of literary texts. As a member of various initiatives in the field of Digital Humanities, he is interested in historical, experimental and computational methods to look at aesthetic behavior of humans.

 

Respondent:

Fabienne Gautier, Head of Unit, European Commission, Directorate-General for Research & Innovation

 

Moderator:

Prof. Jan Palmowski, Secretary General of the Guild

 

Program available here

 

Registration for this event is now closed. If you have further questions please contact our office at office@the-guild.eu

historical, experimental and computational methods to look at aesthetic behavior of humans
historical, experimental and computational methods to look at aesthetic behavior of humans
historical, experimental and computational methods to look at aesthetic behavior of
historical, experimental and computational methods to look at aesthetic behavior of humanRespo
Published Nov. 25, 2016 10:22 AM - Last modified Apr. 20, 2017 9:44 AM